Log Page Viewer

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Like Mode Pages, SCSI family devices (remember, this includes FC and SAS peripherals) will typically have log pages. These log pages are used to report cumulative totals. These totals may be used to assist the administrator in tuning efforts, error diagnosis, or administration tasks. The ANSI SCSI specifications allow for hundreds of log pages, as well as vendor-specific pages.  To further complicate the issue, as new ANSI specifications come out, they will add new log pages, and possibly retire others.

 

We make an effort to maintain internal tables of both ANSI defined log pages, and vendor specific pages as well. As release levels of the code increase, additional vendor/model specific entries are always added. As log and mode page settings are sometimes vendor specific and are only released under NDA, it sometimes takes us time to get permission and  the necessary information to report these settings to you.

 

To view all the mode pages for a particular device, in hex, enter

/etc/smartmon-ux -C /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0

-or -

/etc/smartmon-ux -C+ /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0

-or -

/etc/smartmon-ux -Cx /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0

 

On our IRIX development system, the device reported the below:

# /etc/smartmon-ux -C

SMARTMon-ux [Release 1.26, Build 22-APR-2004] - Copyright 2001-2004 SANtools, Inc. http://www.SANtools.com

Discovered SEAGATE ST336605FC S/N "3FP009Z6" on /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0 [SES] (SMART enabled) (34732 MB)

Statistical log pages dump below [# of bytes reserved for value in device]:

  Port receiving this command 0=A, 1=B: 1 [2]

  Port A link failure count: 0 [4]

  Port A loss of synchronization count: 2 [4]

  Port A invalid transmission word count: 5 [4]

  Port A invalid CRC count: 0 [4]

  Port B link failure count: 1 [4]

  Port B loss of synchronization count: 45 [4]

  Port B invalid transmission word count: 196624 [4]

  Port B invalid CRC count: 0 [4]

  Logical blocks sent to initiators: 83780318 [4]

  Logical blocks received from initiators: 6623284 [4]

  Logical blocks read from cache, sent to initiators: 45424812 [4]

  Number of read and write commands <= current segment size: 366966 [4]

  Number of read and write commands > current segment size: 76687 [4]

  Power-on time in minutes: 38260 [4]

  Time in minutes until the next scheduled interrupt for a S.M.A.R.T. measurement: 66 [4]

  Write errors corrected with possible delays: 0 [4]

  Total write errors: 0 [4]

  Write errors corrected: 0 [4]

  Times correction algorithm processed (on writes): 0 [4]

  Bytes processed (on writes): 3401038336 [8]

  Unrecovered errors (on writes): 0 [4]

  Read errors corrected without substantial delay: 887 [4]

  Read errors corrected with possible delays: 0 [4]

  Total read errors: 0 [4]

  Read errors corrected: 887 [4]

  Times correction algorithm processed (on reads): 887 [4]

  Bytes processed (on reads): 88372689408 [8]

  Unrecovered errors (on reads): 0 [4]

  Verify errors corrected without substantial delay: 0 [4]

  Verify errors corrected with possible delays: 0 [4]

  Total verify errors: 0 [4]

  Verify errors corrected: 0 [4]

  Times correction algorithm processed (on verifys): 0 [4]

  Bytes processed (on verifys): 0 [8]

  Unrecovered errors (on verifys): 0 [4]

  Total Non-medium errors: 0 [4]

  Current temperature +/- 3 degrees C: 37

  Reference temperature +/- 3 degrees C: 65

  Self-test (extended background): FAILED in segment #0 at Block #00000000 000238CFh @ 214 powered hours [Drive media failed] Unrecovered read error ASC=11 ASCQ=00, SelfTestByte=00, VendorSpecificByte=E4

  Self-test (short background): Completed w/o error @ 134 powered hours

  Self-test (short background): Completed w/o error @ 24 powered hours

  Self-test (standard): Completed w/o error @ 1 powered hours

Terminating program.

 

If you sent the command with the -Cx option, then the numbers in brackets would be suppressed.  The bracketized field shows you how many bytes the selected peripheral allocates for the resulting data. This is useful in the event you need to assess the possibility that the field rolled over (like an odometer).

 

# /etc/smartmon-ux -Cx

SMARTMon-ux [Release 1.26, Build 10-JUN-2008] - Copyright 2001-2008 SANtools, Inc. http://www.SANtools.com

Discovered SEAGATE ST336605FC S/N "3FP009Z6" on /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0 [SES] (SMART enabled) (34732 MB)

Statistical log pages dump below [# of bytes reserved for value in device]:

  Port receiving this command 0=A, 1=B: 1

  Port A link failure count: 0

  Port A loss of synchronization count: 2

...

 

There are some interesting things to see here:

Read or Write errors - We have 887 corrected read errors. Note that your operating system would not report recovered errors, only unrecovered errors. Recovered errors means your system successfully retried the operation, but this cost you I/O and CPU cycles. If you had any Unrecovered errors, you have some corrupted data.
Number of minutes drive has been powered on.  This disk has been powered on for 38260 minutes, nearly a month. This is a Seagate-specific setting, and certain models of disk report this value as minutes since LAST power on, while other disks report this as cumulative minutes drive has been powered on since leaving the factory. We do not differentiate between the two, because there is no 100% infallible way to tell the difference.  By looking at the other statistics, however, we can make an educated guess that the drive has been up a week since last power cycle. We can tell by examining the cumulative blocks read.  Our IRIX box is only used for compiling and testing code, so having 17GBs read in the 6 months we have had it is reasonable and having read 17GBs in last week is not correct.
The number in parentheses to the right of each value tells you how many bytes that the disk maintains to store these values.
Use that to make a judgment call to see if you have had an overflow. The disk drive does not maintain an overflow counter, so there is no way to know if you really did have a field overflow.
You can see that the disk processed 83,780,118 blocks, but only had 45,424,812 cache hits. That corresponds to over a 54% read cache hit rate.
This disk is a fibre channel drive, and it has some problems on Port B.

 

This manual does not contain the record layout and meanings of log pages for every make and model of SCSI device. This information is typically available from your disk manufacturer's web site. If you are interested in tuning your disk or advanced problem diagnosis, you should contact your disk manufacturer and request the information. We have found that IBM and Seagate are most cooperative and have all information online. Other vendors need to be "prodded" a bit.

 

Now, let us look at the same disk, but view the log pages in Hex format:  (You can enter -H or -H+, both will report all log pages, but the -H+ option will perform a brute-force discovery)

 

# /etc/smartmon-ux -H | more

SMARTMon-ux [Release 1.12, Build 25-AUG-2002] - Copyright 2002 SANtools, Inc. http://www.SANtools.com

Discovered SEAGATE ST336605FC S/N "3FP009Z6" on /hw/scsi/sc2d66l0 [SES] (SMART enabled) (34732 MB)

[Adapter/ID.LUN=4/4.0](34732 MB)

Statistical log pages raw dump below:

 Log page 00h:

  0000: 00 00 00 0A 00 02 03 05 06 0D 10 37 3D 3E          ...........7=>

 Log page 02h:

  0000: 02 00 00 34 00 01 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 02 20 04    ...4.. ....... .

  0010: 00 00 00 00 00 03 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 04 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0020: 00 00 00 00 00 05 20 08 00 00 00 00 CA B7 BA 00    ...... .........

  0030: 00 06 20 04 00 00 00 00                            .. .....

 Log page 03h:

  0000: 03 00 00 3C 00 00 20 04 00 00 03 77 00 01 20 04    ...<.. ....w.. .

  0010: 00 00 00 00 00 02 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 03 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0020: 00 00 03 77 00 04 20 04 00 00 03 77 00 05 20 08    ...w.. ....w.. .

  0030: 00 00 00 14 93 6C 3A 00 00 06 20 04 00 00 00 00    .....l:... .....

 Log page 05h:

  0000: 05 00 00 3C 00 00 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 01 20 04    ...<.. ....... .

  0010: 00 00 00 00 00 02 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 03 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0020: 00 00 00 00 00 04 20 04 00 00 00 00 00 05 20 08    ...... ....... .

  0030: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 06 20 04 00 00 00 00    .......... .....

 Log page 06h:

  0000: 06 00 00 08 00 00 20 04 00 00 00 00                ...... .....

 Log page 0Dh:

  0000: 0D 00 00 78 00 00 20 02 00 24 00 01 20 02 00 41    ...x.. ..$.. ..A

  0010: 00 02 20 02 00 24 80 FF 20 02 00 01 81 00 20 04    .. ..$.. ..... .

  0020: 00 00 00 00 81 01 20 04 00 00 00 02 81 02 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0030: 00 00 00 00 81 03 20 04 00 00 00 00 81 04 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0040: 00 00 00 05 81 05 20 04 00 00 00 00 81 10 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0050: 00 00 00 01 81 11 20 04 00 00 00 2D 81 12 20 04    ...... ....-.. .

  0060: 00 00 00 00 81 13 20 04 00 00 00 00 81 14 20 04    ...... ....... .

  0070: 00 03 00 10 81 15 20 04 00 00 00 00                ...... .....

 Log page 10h:

  0000: 10 00 01 90 00 01 03 10 20 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF    ........ .......

  0010: FF FF FF FF 00 00 00 00 00 02 03 10 20 00 00 00    ............ ...

  0020: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 00 00 00 00 03 03 10    ................

  0030: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0040: 00 04 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0050: 00 00 00 00 00 05 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0060: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 06 03 10 00 00 00 00    ................

  0070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 07 03 10    ................

  0080: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0090: 00 08 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  00a0: 00 00 00 00 00 09 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  00b0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A 03 10 00 00 00 00    ................

  00c0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0B 03 10    ................

  00d0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  00e0: 00 0C 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  00f0: 00 00 00 00 00 0D 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0100: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0E 03 10 00 00 00 00    ................

  0110: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0F 03 10    ................

  0120: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0130: 00 10 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0140: 00 00 00 00 00 11 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0150: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 12 03 10 00 00 00 00    ................

  0160: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 13 03 10    ................

  0170: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0180: 00 14 03 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

  0190: 00 00 00 00                                        ....

 Log page 37h:

  0000: 37 00 00 28 00 00 20 04 04 FE 62 DE 00 01 20 04    7..(.. ...b... .

  0010: 00 65 10 34 00 02 20 04 02 B5 20 AC 00 03 20 04    .e.4.. ... ... .

  0020: 00 05 99 76 00 04 20 04 00 01 2B 8F                ...v.. ...+.

 Log page 3Dh:

  0000: 3D 00 00 F0 00 01 00 06 0A 00 01 00 00 00 00 03    =...............

  0010: 00 E2 0A 00 01 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF    ................

  0020: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  0030: 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  0040: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 03 FF FF FF    ................

  0050: FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  0060: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 04 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  0070: FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  0080: FF FF FF FF 05 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF    ................

  0090: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  00a0: 06 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  00b0: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 07 FF FF FF    ................

  00c0: FF FF FF FF FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  00d0: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 08 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  00e0: FF 02 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF    ................

  00f0: FF FF FF FF                                        ....

 Log page 3Eh:

  0000: 3E 00 00 10 00 00 20 04 00 00 95 7F 00 08 20 04    >..... ....... .

  0010: 00 00 00 36                                        ...6

 

The values above really only make sense if you have the programming manual specific for your disk drive.

 

As written before, we try to maintain a list of log pages for the most common makes and models. If the -C output does not return anything, but the -H dump does, your peripheral is not in our database. Please contact us if that is the case, and we will make best efforts to revise the database for you.

 

Some devices aren't ANSI compliant, and do not properly supply log page #0, which is a list of valid log pages.  If log page entries do not appear, you may have luck if you use -C+ or -H+ instead of -C and -H.  This instructs the software to use a brute-force discovery process.

 

Also note that even if the disk is in the database, we may not decode all of the log page information. That is because not all fields are in a standard format, and have to be manually decoded. We apologize for this. We choose to report the most common information that people would be interested in. If you desire all of the possibly hundreds of fields yourself, we give you the hex dump above to make that possible.

 

Self-Test Results Syntax Changes for Release 1.26

In version 1.26, we added additional information to the self-test results. Previously, it just reported the test type, block number (if failure detected) and powered hours at the time the test was run. It also only reported the previous 3 results.

 

Now, the program reports the last 20 self-test results (if applicable), the sense data and description of error(s) found, and the values of vendor-unique bytes which would be of value to your disk vendor in event an error is discovered.